MPIP: Melanoma Patients Information Page

The MPIP is the oldest and largest community of people affected by melanoma hosted through the Melanoma Research Foundation. It is designed to provide support and information to caregivers, patients, family and friends. Once you have been touched by melanoma—either as a patient or as a family member or friend of a patient—you become part of a community. It is not a community anyone joins willingly. But if you must be part of this group, you will find no better place to find the tools you need in your journey with this cancer, and the friends who can make that journey more bearable.

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Paulajane's picture
Replies 3
Last reply 4/5/2018 - 10:25pm

So my biopsy came back metastatic melanoma, melanoma cocktail. Since it is going to take 3 weeks to get into the melanoma clinic I pushed for a pet scan so I had an idea of how much cancer I have. The pet scan only had up take on one spot which was one of three more biopsies I had when the first path report came back. Can anyone tell me how the pathologist knows that the first biopsy wasn’t the primary site?

 

since the pet scan Looks so good they said now I can just have the site of the metastatic melanoma surgically exsized and i don’t need to see the specialist at the melanoma clinic. 8m very nervous about this. 

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Anonymous's picture
Replies 8
Last reply 3/27/2018 - 2:17pm
Replies by: Jamie1960, Anonymous, bjeans, CancerSpouse, doragsda, Gene_S, gopher38

Hi guys. So, Is there any natural remedy out there to prevent that disease?  I see Rob578 talks about bee propolis, and I assume  Bubbles disagree with that?  

I marked three years since my melanoma in situ diagnosis, February 2015. 

Thanks, 

eric

 

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Anonymous's picture
Anonymous
Replies 1
Last reply 3/25/2018 - 1:47am
Replies by: Janner

I was recently diagnosed and have a few questions. I went to a local dermatologist to get an "age spot" taken off my face and a mole check while I was at it. She did a punch biopsy of the spot on my face as well as a mole on my back (it's fairly large - maybe 3/4" wide) on 3/15. I've had a few mole checks in the past (I have LOTS of moles, fair skin, too many burns in the past) and this was the most cursory check I've had. Anyway, she said she was on vacation this past week so would get back to me when she returned unless something came up (which was not expected). So I get a call Wednesday and the nurse tells me the mole on my back is "early stage" melanoma. I was a bit shocked and at work and didn't think to ask more than what stage. The nurse said there was no stage because it was early and the dr would just cut it out and I'd come back for more regular checks after that. Made an appointment for a week later to see the dr. I googled after that and learned more about what to ask. Called the next day and she said the pathology report said "invasive melanoma", 0.3MM, and no ulceration. Overall I know this is good (maybe stage 1A?). Nurse scheduled surgery for 4/17 because that was the earliest they could get me in. I'm not feeling very comfortable about this because (1) I wasn't that thrilled with the check in the first place, (2) the nurse didn't seem to know what she was talking about and was minimizing my concerns/questions, and (3) the dr contradicted herself on how to address the other mole, which I won't go into here. Should I just have this dr take it off and be done with it, or find a new dr?  This one is local and convenient but my confidence is low. On the other hand, if it's really not a big deal maybe it doens't matter? Also, is 3-4 weeks too long to wait? I'm also going to Hawaii next week on vacation with my kids. I have no idea how much to be concerned about sun exposure while there.

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Rob578's picture
Replies 11
Last reply 3/28/2018 - 9:42am

I'm NOT advocating by any means  Bee Propolis is a cure or alternative just an enhancement.

US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health 

Adv Clin Exp Med. 2015 Mar-Apr;24(2):203-12. doi: 10.17219/acem/31792.
The Ethanol Extract of Polish Propolis Exhibits Anti-Proliferative and/or Pro-Apoptotic Effect on HCT 116 Colon Cancer and Me45 Malignant Melanoma Cells In Vitro Conditions.
Kubina R1, Kabała-Dzik A1, Dziedzic A2, Bielec B1, Wojtyczka RD3, Bułdak RJ4, Wyszyńska M1, Stawiarska-Pięta B1, Szaflarska-Stojko E1.
Author information
1
Department of Pathology, Medical University of Silesia, Sosnowiec, Poland.
2
Department of Conservative Dentistry with Endodontics, Medical University of Silesia, Bytom, Poland.
3
Department of Microbiology and Virology, Medical University of Silesia, Sosnowiec, Poland.
4
Department of Physiology, Medical University of Silesia, Zabrze, Poland.
Abstract
BACKGROUND:
Propolis is a natural product widely consumed in folk medicine. Different biological activities, such as anticancer, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antibiotic and antifungal effects have been reported for propolis and its constituents.
OBJECTIVES:
An in vitro study focused on an evaluation of the biological activity of EEPP, including its anti-proliferative influence on selected neoplastic cells, considering qualitative-quantitative chemical characterization of Polish propolis.
MATERIAL AND METHODS:
Cytotoxicity was evaluated by means of the MTT and LDH assays. The apoptosis was determined using fluorescence microscopy with annexin V-FITC. Additional EEPP composition was analyzed by a High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) method. The antimicrobial activity was evaluated by minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) against Streptococcus aureus, Enetecoccus faecalis, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans.

.
RESULTS:
The total content of flavonoids per quercetin in the examined propolis extract amounted to 0.442±0.091 mg/mL. The flavonoid compounds identified in Polish propolis included flavones, flavonones, flavonolols, flavonols and phenolic acids. The multi-directional interactions among the various chemical compounds in propolis seem to be the essential biological activities when considering its anticancer effects. The results showed that in case of Me45 and HCT 116 cell lines, the ethanol extract of propolis could inhibit cell growth as well as cell size reduction. Regarding antimicrobial activity, EEPP showed MICs ranging from 0.39 to 6.25 mg/mL.
CONCLUSIONS:
Ethanol extract of propolis from Poland obtained in the study exhibits anti-proliferative activity in different carcinoma cells.
PMID:
25931350
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

 

J Agric Food Chem. 2016 Jul 13;64(27):5484-9. doi: 10.1021/acs.jafc.6b01785. Epub 2016 Jul 1.
Effect of Okinawa Propolis on PAK1 Activity, Caenorhabditis elegans Longevity, Melanogenesis, and Growth of Cancer Cells.
Taira N1, Nguyen BC1, Be Tu PT1, Tawata S2.
Author information
Abstract
Propolis from different areas has been reported to inhibit oncogenic/aging kinase PAK1, which is responsible for a variety of conditions, including cancer, longevity, and melanogenesis. Here, a crude extract of Okinawa propolis (OP) was tested against PAK1 activity, Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) longevity, melanogenesis, and growth of cancer cells. We found that OP blocks PAK1 and exhibits anticancer activity in the A549 cell (human lung cancer cell) line with IC50 values of 6 μg/mL and 12 μg/mL, respectively. Most interestingly, OP (1 μg/mL) significantly reduces reproduction and prolongs the lifespan of C. elegans by activating the HSP-16.2 gene, as shown in the PAK1-deficient strain. Furthermore, OP inhibits melanogenesis in a melanoma cell line (B16F10) by downregulating intracellular tyrosinase activity with an IC50 of 30 μg/mL. Our results suggest that OP demonstrated a life span extending effect, C. elegans, anticancer, and antimelanogenic effects via PAK1 inactivation; therefore, this can be a potent natural medicinal supplement against PAK1-dependent diseases.
KEYWORDS:
Caenorhabditis elegans; Okinawa propolis; PAK1; cancer; longevity; melanogenesis
PMID:
27337169
DOI:
10.1021/acs.jafc.6b01785
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

 

J Nat Prod. 2013 Aug 23;76(8):1399-405. doi: 10.1021/np400129z. Epub 2013 Jul 22.
Caffeic acid phenethyl ester inhibits alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone-induced melanin synthesis through suppressing transactivation activity of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor.
Lee JY1, Choi HJ, Chung TW, Kim CH, Jeong HS, Ha KT.
Author information
Abstract
Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (1), a natural compound found in various plants and propolis, is a well-known anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, and cytotoxic agent. The present study aimed to investigate the molecular events underlying the antimelanogenic activity of 1 in alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH)-stimulated B16-F10 melanoma cells. In this investigation, 1 effectively reduced α-MSH-stimulated melanin synthesis by suppressing expression of melanogenic enzymes such as tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related protein-1 (TRP-1), and tyrosinase-related protein-2 (TRP-2), although this compound did not directly inhibit tyrosinase enzyme activity. On the other hand, the expression and nuclear translocation of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) as a key transcription factor for tyrosinase expression regulating melanogenesis were not affected by treatment with 1. The upstream signaling pathways including cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β), and Akt for activation and expression of MITF were also not influenced by 1. Interestingly, 1 inhibited transcriptional activity of a tyrosinase promoter by suppressing the interaction of MITF protein with an M-box containing a CATGTG motif on the tyrosinase promoter. Given the important role of MITF in melanogenesis, suppression of 1 on the function of MITF to transactivate tyrosinase promoter may present a novel therapeutic approach to treat hyperpigmentation disorders.
PMID:
23876066
DOI:
10.1021/np400129z
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
 

Oncol Lett. 2016 Dec;12(6):4813-4820. doi: 10.3892/ol.2016.5251. Epub 2016 Oct 13.
Chrysin induces cell apoptosis in human uveal melanoma cells via intrinsic apoptosis.
Xue C1, Chen Y2, Hu DN3, Iacob C4, Lu C5, Huang Z1.
Author information
Abstract
Uveal melanoma is the most common intraocular malignant tumor in adults. Chrysin is a flavonoid present in honey, propolis, various plants and herbs. In the present study, the cytotoxic effects of chrysin were investigated on human uveal melanoma cell lines (M17 and SP6.5) and associated signaling pathways, and a comparison to the effects on normal ocular cells [scleral fibroblasts and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells] was performed. The effects of chrysin on cell viability were assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Cell apoptosis was determined by using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay. Mitochondrial permeability was determined by JC-1 fluorescein analysis. Cytosol cytochrome c levels, and the activities of caspase-3, -8 and -9 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or colorimetric assay. Chrysin reduced the viability of cultured human melanoma cells in a dose-dependent manner (0, 10, 30 and 100 µM) with IC50 at 28.3 and 35.8 µM in SP6.5 and M17 cell lines, respectively. Chrysin at 30-100 µM levels selectively reduced the viability of melanoma cells without affecting the viability of scleral fibroblasts and RPE cells. Chrysin increased mitochondrial permeability, the levels of cytosol cytochrome c, and caspase-9 and -3 activities, but not capase-8 activity in uveal melanoma cells. The results of the present study indicate that chrysin induces apoptosis of human uveal melanoma cells via the mitochondrial signaling pathway and suggest that chrysin may be a promising agent in the treatment of uveal melanoma.
KEYWORDS:
apoptosis; caspase-3; caspase-9; chrysin; cytochrome c; uveal melanoma
PMID:
28105189
 

 

 

 

 

 

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Anonymous's picture
Replies 11
Last reply 4/3/2018 - 1:36am
Replies by: Shann, Janner

Hi

I have recently been diagnosed with in situ melanoma.  Would like some help with my pathology please.  I have had a WLE.  It says the following:

Excision Margins 3mm from 12 oclock 3.2 from 6 oclock.  

Ulceration - Absent

Pigmentation - present

Mitotic n/a

Lymp invasion n/a

Distribution Focal

Density Sparse

Regression - Not identified

Assoc benign naevus

growth - nested, lentiginous and pagetoid

subtype superficial spreading

Excision of scar appears complete.

Sections show skin excision with biopsy site changes.  There is residual atypical melanocytic proliferation along the dermoepidermal junction exhibiting nested, lentiginous and focally pagetoid growth pattersn and comprising highly atypical melanocytes with focal pigmentation.  No invasion is identified.  The features are those of insitu malignancy melanoma of superfical spreading subtype.  No evidence ulceration.

My questions are the surgeon was taking 5mm but in the end it was 3.00 than 3.2 which he said was due to shrinkage.  Is this common?  And he said all margins clear all good and I would not need anymore taken.  He also said the border was mostly a-typical cells?  The lesion was taken from the side of my face in front of my ear. Thanks 

 


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Guinnes0820's picture
Replies 2
Last reply 3/26/2018 - 11:20am
Replies by: iskitwo, Janner

I had an ugly duckling mole removed. The dermatologist informed me that it didn’t look like my other moles, with a different color scheme. My question is, do ugly duckling moles always contain melanoma, especially in a patient with an abundance of both typical and atypical moles? If not, what makes one single mole so different from the rest?

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Anonymous's picture
Anonymous
Replies 2
Last reply 3/26/2018 - 9:58am
Replies by: JuTMSY4, BillB

Diagnosed with stage 1 b melanoma on right ear on 12/2017. Had wedge resection with sentinel lymph node biopsy one of the lymph node was positive with very few cancer cells. January 23 had lymphadenectomy to remove 10 lymph nodes and a salivary gland since one of the lymph node was attached to it. Final stage 3a 

Is lymphadema common with this type of procedure? 

How is this procedure is affecting my immune system in dealing with comon upper respiratory infection and seasonal allergies, which I have? 

 

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Bradley75's picture
Replies 4
Last reply 3/28/2018 - 11:31am

Hi All,

It has been a couple of months since I have been here.  I want to share something new that happened to me back in December of last year.

After my t-1 fusion, tumor removal, stabilization surgery in October, I signed a research consent form for Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy.  Based on what I have learned, it seems to me that they are working on Cyber Knife without the presence of a tumor.  They gave me one very large blast that traced the area where the tumor was.  The purpose was to clean up any remnants left behind from surgery.  This procedure made a ton of sense since the tiniest remnant left alive and behind can cause a major problem.  Plus, it gave me another chance to wear the "Rat" label we all love so much.  The leftovers are why I have progressed since my original diagnosis in 2007.

I wanted to share this in case anyone out there might find it helpful if they are in a situation similar to mine.  My followup scan showed complete resolution of that area and now I am NED.  I know the 18 doses of Keytruda have done a lot, but the radiation might have provided a little extra help.  It was completely new to me when the radiation oncologist proposed this therapy as an option.  It has probably been around for years and is nothing new, but it was to me. 

Keep Fighting,

Brad

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Anonymous's picture
Anonymous
Replies 3
Last reply 3/23/2018 - 3:23pm
Replies by: Bubbles, Anonymous

Hello:

After having a brain metastisis removed in January, the melanoma has returned to my dad's brain in the last few weeks. At this point, the suggested therapy by our main oncologist, neurosurgeons, and radiation oncologist is whole-brain radiation followed by temozolomide (Temodar). 

Another oncologist we've consulted with suggested bevacizumab (Avastin) instead of the whole-brain radiation in an effort to maintain his quality of life, which this doctor felt would be impacted by the whole-brain radiotherapy. 

Any opinions from the community on which way to proceed would be appreciated. 

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mrsaxde's picture
Replies 8
Last reply 3/25/2018 - 10:09am

Well, my therapy has been put on hold until Monday. My docs popped in an hour ago to tell me that the lab says the growth curve of my cells is not as robust as they would like to see. They say the cells are growing and reacting the way they should, there's just not enough of them yet. So no chemo today. Instead, we'll be moving forward on Monday.

But because I'm only a couple of hours away from NIH, I get to go home until Sunday evening!

I hope everyone has a great weekend!

-Bill

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cheris's picture
Replies 3
Last reply 3/24/2018 - 1:51am
Replies by: Casitas1, Bubbles, Anonymous

Hi, all,

It has been exactly a year since my last Keytruda treatment, and I'm surprised that I still feel so tired and unenergetic.  What is more concerning is that I feel a tightness in my chest and feeling as if I'm not getting enough oxygen in my lungs  Anyone else a year out?

I also wanted to suggest Magnesium for those with muscle and joint pain.  t one point I was sent to a nerologist and he told me to take it since I had such pains. bBlessings.

Cheris

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NSNewf's picture
Replies 4
Last reply 3/23/2018 - 1:21pm
Replies by: Bubbles, bjeans, gopher38

I subscribe to a number of online medical journals. This just came in

 

http://www.cancernetwork.com/melanoma/adjuvant-immunotherapy-advanced-me...

 

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Tracyyy's picture
Replies 2
Last reply 3/23/2018 - 11:07am
Replies by: Tracyyy, Bubbles

Hi all! Just wanted to say that after all the struggles to find proper treatment in my country we managed to find a good trial here and mum finally started treatment today! She is in the triple combo Dab/Tram + PDR001 or Dab/Tram +placebo. We do not know what she is getting because it is double blinded but good thing is she is getting the BRAF inhibitors for sure. She is stage 3c unresectable. Hope she will get a durable response. Is anyone in the same trial? Best wishes to you all!

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dessie's picture
Replies 5
Last reply 4/1/2018 - 3:06am

Hey all

Yesterday was my second dose of 240 mg of Opdivo.  It went well but noticed it was over in no time... Came to find our they are now infusing the 240 mg over 30 minutes rather than an hour.  The only reaction  I have had is skin itching  and weird skin outbreaks (as I had and still have with my first infusion) but the fatgue was more this time. Slept 12 hours but going to work this am.  The nurse said that they are ramping up the time of infusions as well.  

Anyone taking the 240 mg dose notice this?  So every 2 weeks a 30 minute infusion of the 240 mg is now my regime rather than an hour.  As long as it works... im ok with it.

Beats the alternative!!

All the best 

Dessie

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dessie's picture
Replies 1
Last reply 4/16/2018 - 1:44pm
Replies by: Raco

Hey all

Yesterday was my second dose of 240 mg of Opdivo.  It went well but noticed it was over in no time... Came to find our they are now infusing the 240 mg over 30 minutes rather than an hour.  The only reaction  I have had is skin itching  and weird skin outbreaks (as I had and still have with my first infusion) but the fatgue was more this time. Slept 12 hours but going to work this am.  The nurse said that they are ramping up the time of infusions as well.  

Anyone taking the 240 mg dose notice this?  So every 2 weeks a 30 minute infusion of the 240 mg is now my regime rather than an hour.  As long as it works... im ok with it.

Beats the alternative!!

All the best 

Dessie

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